Cue 152 – If You Have Writer’s Block, Maybe You Should Stop Lying

If You Have Writer’s Block, Maybe You Should Stop Lying

“I find that this is an overlooked source of writing difficulty. I find that people often believe they have a writing technique problem, when, actually, what they have is a sincerity problem. They think that writing is onerous, when, actually, they mean that writing as if they’re someone else is onerous. If you’re not the kind of person who actually cares much about writing an epic fantasy novel, then no matter how much you think you ought to write an epic fantasy novel, it won’t feel good. This doesn’t mean never tailoring your writing to your audience, it just means that you should shape who you are into a palatable format, rather than gussying up who you’re not.” – Sasha Chapin

Cue 150 – What Becoming a Parent Really Does to Your Happiness

What Becoming a Parent Really Does to Your Happiness

“This relates to a second point, which is that there’s more to life than happiness. When I say that raising my sons is the best thing I’ve ever done, I’m not saying that they gave me pleasure in any simple day-to-day sense, and I’m not saying that they were good for my marriage. I’m talking about something deeper, having to do with satisfaction, purpose, and meaning.”

Cue 147 – Can People Change? The Psychological Möbius Strip That Keeps Us from Ending Painful Relationships

Can People Change? The Psychological Möbius Strip That Keeps Us from Ending Painful Relationships

“While the death of a loved one can make the notion of moving on unfathomable at first, it also makes it, by definition, inevitable — there is no other recourse, for such loss is unambiguous and irreversible. But there is a species of grief, spawned of a type of loss that is more ambiguous and elastic, that muddles the notion of moving on into an impassable and disorienting swamp: the cyclical grief of loving someone on the grounds of their highest nature and watching them fall short of it over and over, in damaging and hurtful ways, which you excuse over and over, because of their impassioned apologies and vows of reform, or because of the partly noble, partly naïve notion that a truly magnanimous person is one who always has the breadth of spirit to forgive — a notion rooted in a basic misapprehension of what forgiveness really means.” – Maria Popova